tigertraceur

dynastylnoire:

jujubee58:

priceofliberty:

thinksquad:

Newly obtained surveillance video shows the violent encounter between a 17-year-old girl and Clairton police officers that left the teenager in the hospital.

A 17-year-old girl claims she was beaten by police in Clairton after she and her friends were stopped for a curfew violation Tuesday night.

Merceedez Wright admits she and her friends were out a few minutes after the city’s 10 p.m. curfew, and that she both ran from officers and resisted them after being tackled, but she doesn’t believe she deserves the injuries she suffered.

Wright is now recovering in the hospital with injuries to her trachea, esophagus and neck, plus several cuts and bruises.

"She’s a cheerleader, she’s a lifeguard at the Clairton pool, she was just on prom court," said Wright’s mother, Audelia Amoah. "She’s a good kid."

Even so, Wright admits she ran from officers.

"I was scared because of how he got out of the car. He didn’t just walk out, he jumped out of the car and started chasing me, so my first instinct was to run," she said.

Wright also said she did resist officers once she was knocked to the ground. She said she was trying to get her arms free to protect herself.

Clairton police did not respond to requests for comment.

Read more: http://www.wtae.com/news/teenage-girl-says-police-beat-her-after-curfew-violation/26992088#ixzz388DHjtCm

You think this is sickening? Me too

551 Ravensburg Blvd
Clairton, PA
(412) 233-8113

press ‘OPTION 6’ to be connected to the Clairton Police Department.

Flood their mailbox, flood their inbox!

Robert Hoffman is the Chief of Police and you can contact them directly here.

I just wrote in: “Newly obtained surveillance video shows the violent encounter between 17-year-old Merceedez Wright and Clairton police officers that left the teenager in the hospital.

She admits to being out past 10pm AND to “running” from the cops. When I was her age, I was in the same situation and the altercation did not result in me being tackled, in my head or neck being smashed against pavement, or a hospital bill.

I was told to call my mother while the officer POLITELY waited there for her to come pick me up. How is CPD training these officers that their first course of action is to pummel a little girl? The officers involved should be reprimanded without compensation.”

They didn’t do it because she’s a girl, they did it because she’s a black girl!

Pittsburgh is not safe for black folks.

I’m trying to tell you.

chromatolysis

Coming Out Simulator 2014 - a half-true game about half-truths

Coming Out Simulator is exactly what it says it is. It’s a free-to-play conversation simulator based on/inspired by the personal story of coming out of its creator, Nicky Case.

There’s no easy answer in Coming Out Simulator, no optimal ending to be achieved if you collect the requisite amount of points. Case based the game off a pivotal moment in his own life as a teenager. And just like in real life, the moment of “coming out” in this game is traumatic no matter which way the player chooses to approach it.

Ultimately, it’s liberating as well. But that’s not what the brunt of the experience playing Coming Out Simulator is actually like. […] There’s power in exploring a fantasy like the one in Mass Effect 3, but there’s also power in being reminded that “coming out” the way one does in that game is a fantasy, and a pretty far-fetched one for many people who faced far more difficult challenges when they actually came out.

Coming Out Simulator is a game about that second experience. It’s a painful one. But it’s also a necessary one, that I think more people who’ve never had to struggle with their own sexual identity should see for themselves. 

tigertraceur

micdotcom:

Dramatic photos capture the rapid decline of a single Detroit block

It’s a heartbreaking story told in just six pictures.

After a fire destroyed nine houses on one block of Garland Street in Detroit, the Detroit News looked back to tell the block’s story. While their reporting went back nearly a century, the images only need to go back seven years to make an impact.

The dangerous epidemic sweeping Detroit